Impermanace

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Impermanence

Today’s photo blog post is a tribute to my husband’s uncle, Tom Martin. He passed away last night after a battle with cancer.

When I heard the news I thought about this photo I took two years ago. Cherry blossoms represent the fleeting, yet beautiful, nature of life itself. They are beautiful but we only get to enjoy them for a short time.

Uncle Tom was a good soul. He literally lit up the room when he was in it and he always had a joke or a good story to tell. I am really going to miss him.

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Geeky photo bits:
Camera: Yashica Mat 124g
Film: Ektar 100

March Postcard Swap!

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The March postcard swap is now live, folks! This has been a really fun way of sharing your photography IRL. I have been really enjoying getting prints from friends all over the world in my mailbox. It’s also a really good excuse for me to get into the darkroom!

The gorgeous contact print featured on this post was sent from my Twitter and IG buddy, Brandon.

We are exchanging postcards-sized prints of our original photography. Both digital and film photography welcome! If you are interested in participating for March, fill out the form below, or go here if you can’t see it below.

swoosh!

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Swoosh
I don’t think I have mentioned this here on this blog, but I have been part of a really wonderful project these past months: The Next Best Thing Pinhole Project, hosted by Herschel of Square Peg Pinhole. If you haven’t heard of it, I encourage you to go check it out. There are several of us all over the world posting two images for each of the 4 quarters of the year, a culture image and a landscape image. Pinhole photography is the medium. I have really, really enjoyed seeing the submissions from around the world but the highlight for me (so far) was seeing the photo of penguins in Antarctica.

 

Above is my landscape submission from last quarter.

I can’t resist swishing my feet through a pile of leaves on a beautiful fall day. It is one of my favorite things this time of year. This photo was taken on a very windy fall day at Wildwood Park on Mt. Hood in Oregon.
Camera: Zero 4×5 (25mm configuration) with Graflex “23” 120 roll back.
Film: Expired Fuji Provia, cross processed.

Here is where the rest of my photos submitted so far are, if you are interested.

How to watch the film, Primer.

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How To Watch The Film, Primer.

1. Watch the film without reading about it first. You won’t understand it and you will break your brain trying to. Just watch and let it sink in. Don’t think too much.

2. Read the Spark Notes. You will barely begin to understand some of it.

3. Read this  chart  posted at Unrealitymag.com . You will get halfway through the chart and your brain will hurt. ‘

4. Read Wikipedia article.

5. Read the “Time Travel In Primer” chart in the Wikipedia article. It will kind of start to make sense.

6. Watch movie again with the complicated chart sitting in front of you.

7. Pause movie several times to have a discussion with your significant other about what is happening.

8. Read complicated chart again when movie is over.

9. Repeat.

River Pool

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river pool

Here is a photo I took last September. This has been sitting in my “photos to upload to Flickr” folder for months and months. When I first saw it, it didn’t do much for me. It was one of those where I thought, “Meh.” So it just sat there, waiting for me to upload it. I finally got around to it the other day and I am surprised by the positive feedback I have received on Flickr. Why is it so hard to know what other people will like compared to what I like? I feel so disconnected with that part of the creative process, and I do feel like connecting with others is part of the creative process. But I feel like it should be genuine and true to oneself. However, one can’t deny the way something connects with others, either. That’s important, too.

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Geeky Photo Bits
Camera: Zero 4×5 (25mm) with Graflex ’23’ 120 back.
Exposure: 1 minute
Film: Provia (expired)
Develop: C-41 (lab)
Scan: Epson V500

 

Surreal Purple Landscape

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I mentioned a few months ago that I saw the documentary The Enclave at the Portland Art Museum. The documentary was filmed in Aerochrome which renders the landscape in brilliant pinks and reds. The choice of this film was brilliant for many reasons. Reasons that belong in their very own blog post.

This particular blog post is about film. Being a film photography enthusiast, I am fascinated by a film that changes the look of a landscape. Sadly, Aeorchrome is discontinued.

Enter Lomography*.

They are selling a film called Lomochrome Purple XR. The film does something similar in that it shifts greens to purples and creates very surreal landscapes. Blue Moon sells it locally so I picked some up and loaded it into my Olympus XA. Here are the results.

The film has an ISO rating of 100-400, so I tried it at 100, 200, and 400, depending on where I was. I didn’t see much of a difference in color shifts in the various ISO choices. The photos shot in brighter sunlight seem to be a bit more purpley but not that much more, as you can see above.

Yesterday I shot a roll of Lomo Purple in my pinhole camera at the beach and I am really looking forward to seeing how those came out. I will share the results here when I get them back from the lab.

*As much as I want to hate Lomography I can’t. They keep making products I like! Dammit!