Tag Archives: photography

Lazy Afternoon

Lazy Afternoon

Every once in awhile I will look at one of my photos and I will say to myself, “Monica, you’ve made a pretty good photo there.” I can probably count on one hand the photos I feel really and truly good about. This is one of those photos. I really like it alot. It helped that when I took it I was hanging out with two very talented pinhole photographer friends of mine, Donna and Gretchen, and that I basically stole their composition. :) Well, copy-catted them anyway.

We had such a great day! I swam in the lake with a unicorn mask on. It was fun!

this was made with my Zero Image 4×5 camera and a 120 roll back. Ektar film.

Fleece The People

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A couple of months ago I mentioned that the Traveling Yashica was on it’s way to me. Well, the camera came and went I and I had a blast with it! I shot three rolls of film through it, two for me and one for a films swap with Hamish, the owner of the camera. I shot a roll of slide film and a roll of Black and White film through it. I think this is my favorite from the roll of slide film. I took this at a carnival during my small town’s Mountain Day’s festival. The carnival visits every year and when it comes to town I always remember the conversation I had with a young man who worked there about fleecing the people who go to it. 

Read all about my adventures with The Traveling Yashica here!

Blue (a cyanotype tutorial from a cyanotype newbie)

BlueI spent some time last Monday doing more cyanotypes. I made them 4×6 so I could use them as postcards for the postcard swap.

I am really enjoying this printing process. I am learning all kinds of things about printing in general, and specifically contact printing (which I am finding myself interested in).

In case anyone is interested in how this is done, here is how I made this particular print:

1. Find a photo that you think might make a good print. I am still trying to figure what kinds of photos make good cyanotype prints. I have read a few things about this but I learn best via trial and error. Her is the original shot I used. I took it last year in Vacouver B.C. at the farmer’s market on Granville Island.

Sunflowers

2. Invert your photo in your favorite image editing software. The idea is to make your photo into a large negative, as cyanotype is a contact printing process. I use Adobe Lightroom so for me to invert my image I had to adjust the tone curve (using the instructions here).  I created a develop preset for this function.

3. Make your digital negative printable. This, oddly, was the hardest part of this whole process for me at first. Then I discovered Lightroom has a printing module . It makes this part really easy.  I save my file as a PDF.

4. Print digital negative onto transparency paper. You can buy  transparency paper at office supply stores or at Amazon.

5. Mix chemistry. I use the Photographer’s Formulary liquid kit. Mix even amounts of A and B. You will not need very much of each. A small cup used for cough syrup works well to measure out your chemistry. I mix it into a small glass jar recycled from the bin. Once the chemistry is mixed it is photo sensitive so you must mix it in a darkened room. I have a safelight, so I keep that on so I can see. I don’t think the room has to be pitch black dark. I’ve done this in the bathroom with the lights off and light streaming in from under the door and everything turned out fine.

6. Apply chemistry to watercolor paper. This is the part I am still struggling with, so I am not sure I can give much instruction here.  At the moment I am using an art sponge brush and it seems to work OK. I brush it on in horizontal strokes, and then go over it again using vertical strokes. The idea is to get it on evenly and just the right amount.  After you have applied the chemistry let it dry in the dark.

7.  Place your transparency negative on the paper and put a piece of glass on top (sandwich the transparency between the paper and the glass). You want the transparency as flat as possible  on the paper.

8. Place your paper/transparency/glass sandwich in the sun. When your image turns army green it is done.

9. Rinse in running water for 5 minutes. You will watch it develop before your eyes like magic.

10. Place in a hydrogen peroxide/water bath of  for a second to bring out the deep blue color. 50 ML of hydrogen peroxide to 500 ML of water.

11. Let dry.

If I can do this anyone can! It’s fun and easy and a great way to learn about making prints. It would probably be a great thing to do with kids.

 

 

My foray into cyanotype

Produce

I am fascinated by alternative processes when it comes to photography. I love to experiment with stuff (when I can find the time for it). I am especially interested in printing techniques. I’ve been wanting to try cyanotype for quite some time. I tend to procrastinate trying new things for an inordinate amount of time but, thanks to my husband, I jumped into cyanotype faster than I normally would have. it was to my benefit that he was interested in cyanotype as well. He ordered the chemistry and the day it arrived made some prints for himself. Since then it has been something that we do together when there is (the rare) sunny day. Here is my latest effort. I still have a lot to learn but I am having fun with it. The next time I do this I want to make postcard sized prints to send out to my next swap partner.

here are some instagram shots from when we did this

The Great Transatlantic Pinholga Filmswap Project

flowers on the water

Today’s image is from a recent film swap I did with my buddy Brendan, which has led to a project I recently started, and that I am going to share with you today. I am really excited about it!

Several months ago I did a film swap that involved sending my Pinholga to Ireland so that Brendan could double expose over the roll I had already shot. He then reciprocated by shooting a roll, re-winding it, and delivering the camera back to me when we met in Amsterdam. I re-shot the roll in Portland later that month.  The photo above is from the second roll. You can see my favorites from the two rolls here and here.  You can read Brendan’s blog post about it here.

It was a lot of fun seeing my camera on location in Ireland and I was tempted to ask him to send it along to someone else, but I didn’t really have a solid plan in my head for where it should go so I put the idea on the back-burner.

Well. I found out last Friday that the Traveling Yashica is on it’s way to me.  I am going to shoot two rolls with this camera, One for me and one to rewind, put back in the camera, and send back to Hamish where he will re-shoot the roll.

Thinking about this  was the catalyst that brought my idea to fruition: The Great Transatlantic  Pinholga Filmswap Project.  It will be a traveling camera project, like the Traveling Yashica, but with a film swap, pinhole twist. Two rolls of film will be shot. The camera will come loaded with film that has been shot and rewound by the previous person. Then they will shoot another roll, rewind it, and send it on to the next person on the list. And so on, and so on.

I asked a few of my pinhole photography friends if they were interested and I received lots of great feedback and have a nice list of people that will take the project through for a few months!

The idea came to me on Friday and by Sunday morning I’d created a blog for my project. It even has it’s own Twitter and IG hashtag! You can follow it’s adventures on social media here!

If you are interested in the project you can follow the blog:

The Great Transatlantic Pinholga Filmswap Project

If you are interested in participating let me know! The more the merrier!

I am so excited to see how this all plays out!!