The Boat

Photography

I mentioned that during my super productive weekend I developed some film from over the summer and even scanned it! Usually it takes me weeks and weeks to get to the scanning so I’m really stoked with myself for finding the initiative to do this so quickly.

Here is one that I particularly liked. Taken up at Trillium Lake with my Zero and Ektar 100 film.

the boat

You lead the way, I’ll follow

Photography

you lead the way, I'll follow.

My next Holga image is another pinhole shot from my Holga WPC. It was made at one of my favorite places, Wildwood park, up on Mt Hood. I got the title from a little game I was doing a couple of years ago. I got tired of titling my photos by stating the obvious so decided to title them by using the first line of the song I was listening to at the moment. In this case, I think it worked very well. In other cases, not quite as well (though, still, maybe more interesting than stating the obvious). This went on for a couple of months then it was back to business as usual.

How do you come up with good titles for your photos?

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Camera: Holga WPC (6×9 mask)
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Exposure time: ?. Maybe 30 seconds?

White Stag

Photography

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My next Holga shot is one that I’ve always kinda been fond of. I took it on a beautiful spring day in Portland. I beleive this was the first time I used Ektar and I instantly fell in love with it’s saturated tones when I got this roll back.

 

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Geeky Bits:

Camera: Holga 120N
Film: Kodak Ektar 100

The Great Transatlantic Pinhole Filmswap Project

Photography

“What if a person just sent an entire camera, with film re-rolled and ready to double expose,  to another person? My Pinholga is lightweight and cheap, so if it gets lost in the mail it’s no big deal.” This is an idea I had after pondering film swaps and pinhole photography.   And thus an idea started to germinate. A traveling camera film swap.  Two film swaps and a dead camera later, I think we are on track. This time with a new name and a new camera.

10372132_1556444471254055_6580602399781478544_n Todd Schlemmer  graciously donated one of his Terrapin 3d printed pinhole camera systems to the project! Behold, The Great Transatlantic Pinhole Filmswap 2.0 begins!

A few weeks ago I received the new camera in the mail and immediately set out to shoot the roll that Todd had already exposed. I scanned the results last night and couldn’t be happier! I love how they turned out!

The camera will be perfect for the project! It has some really cool features, but the best one is that you can rewind the film in camera (no dark bag needed). This little feature makes it perfect for film swaps!

Interested in joining the fun?  Click here to find out how it works and how to participate.

The Salmon River: Two views from the same camera

Photography

river watching

I have been spending a lot of time with my Zero 4×5 lately and have enjoyed learning how to use it. I mentioned that I was doing a Sheet A Day project and it has really been a wonderful project! I have learned so much. (I stuck with it for 65 days. I had to stop last month because I ran out of film and payday was still a couple of weeks away.)

The photo above is one from that project – I took it at one of my favorite places, the Salmon River on Mt. Hood. I used Arista Edu 100 4×5 film. I used the 25mm configuration of the Zero 4×5. This photo reached #18 on Flickr’s Explore on Oct. 30th! I am rather shocked, but also honored. However, I can’t take myself too seriously here because right next to me in Explore is a photo of a guy laying on the ground taking a photo. sooo, yeah.

Here is a photo I took the same day. It’s the exact same shot, same configuration, but with 120 film instead of 4×5. Ektar was used.

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I think it’s interesting to compare the two. I don’t really have any insight yet as to how I feel about one over the other. I lean more toward color when it comes to pinhole photography, so I find it fascinating that the black and white photo resonated with so many people on Flickr.