Bridge Of The Gods

Photography, Travel and Other Adventures

Originally posted on Pinhole Obscura.

Once upon a time the Chief Of The Gods and his two sons, Pahto and Wy’east, traveled from the North down the Columbia River to find a place to settle. They came upon the most beautiful land they had ever seen and decided that this was the place. However, the two sons quarreled over the land and to settle the dispute their father shot two arrows from his bow: one to the North and one to the South. Pahto followed the arrow to the North and settled there, while Wy’east followed the arrow South. Their father then built A bridge across The Columbia so their family could gather from time to time.

Both sons fell in love with the same woman, the beautiful  Loowit. She could not choose between them so the brothers fought each other for her hand. They buried villages in their destructive wake. The area was left devastated by their war, and the bridge built by their father fell into the Columbia river.

Their father punished the brothers by turning them into mountains. Wy’east became the volcano Mt. Hood, and Pahto became the volcano Mt Adams. The beautiful Loowit became Mt. Saint Helens which stands between Adams and Hood.

The bridge was rebuilt by men and is, to this day, known as The Bridge Of The Gods.

Bridge Of The Gods 1

Exposure time: 5 seconds

Camera: Zero 2000
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Pinhole: 0.18mm
Focal Length: 25mm
ISO: 100
Aperture: f138
Dev: C-41 by Lab
Scan:Epson V500

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A pinhole view of Seattle’s Gum Wall

Photography

The iconic Gum Wall of Seattle is being cleaned today so I thought, in it’s honor, I would re-post a blog I wrote at Pinhole Obscura a couple of years ago. Enjoy!

The Gum Wall in Seattle

Exposure time: 1 min 35 sec.

The Gum Wall of Seattle. This is, at once ¬† disgusting and captivating. According to Wikipedia it started in the early nineties when theater patrons stuck gum to the wall of Post Alley and placed coins in the gum blobs. Why they did this is unknown. But the tradition carried on (sans coins) and now the walls of the alley are covered in used gum blobs and it is passed off as “collective art.”

Is it art? I think it is. There is something about the collective nature of it that I find completely fascinating. It is repulsive but it is also colorful and pretty in its weird way. And it smells good too! The entire alley smells of sugary sweetness.

The Gum Wall in Seattle

Exposure time: 1 min. 35 sec.

Camera: Zero 2000
Film: Ektar 100
Pinhole: 0.18mm
Focal Length: 25mm
ISO: 100
Aperture: f138
Dev: C-41 by Lab
Scan:Epson V500