Women’s March Holga Portraits

Photography

I mentioned a few posts back that I wanted to start taking portaits with my Holga. I decided to take my Holga with me to the Women’s March in Sandy, Oregon two Sundays ago.

I stocked up on some cheap film: Arista.Edu 400. I really regret it because these didn’t turn out great. There are light leaks (I got a fat roll because the tape at the end of the roll wasn’t sticky) and there are some frame numbers showing through. Regardless, I enjoyed taking them and I it was really nice to get out of my comfort zone and ask strangers if I could take their photos. I am pleased with them in that regard.

Group Shot, take 2
God is a Woman
Thank You
Love makes America great
The Photographer
Cathy with umbrella
Generations
Group Shot, Take 1

“Nevertheless, she persisted”

Life

Last night on the Senate floor Senator Elizabeth Warren was silenced by Senator Mitch McConnell as she tried to read the letter that Corretta Scott King wrote in 1986 criticizing Jeff Sessions and his treatment of African Americans in Alabama using his power as a Judge there.

In defiance, Oregon (yay) Senator Jeff Merkley took it upon himself to read the letter . He was allowed to read it in it’s entirety.

If anyone wonders why  millions of women were in the streets marching on January 21st, this is exactly why.

 

“Sen. Warren was giving a lengthy speech,” he said. “She had appeared to violate the rule. She was warned. She was given an explanation. Nevertheless, she persisted.” – Mitch McConnell

Indeed. Thanks for the new rallying cry!

 

 

Pussy hats galore

Craft, Life

In my post about the Women’s March I talked a little bit about the lead up to the march and my indifference. At the time, I didn’t see the point of protesting. I didn’t see how it could accomplish anything. As I pondered these thoughts I kept seeing these hats pop up on my IG feed and, occasionally, around town. I had to admit, I was curious. But I couldn’t drum up enough interest to knit one.

Then I read an article, written by a woman, who was irritated by the pussy hat. I can’t find the article right now (dammit) but I remember her mentioning that the hat would be made fun of, that the march was a serious matter and the hat would distill the march into something silly. She used “bra burning” as an example from the past.

I saw many of my knitter friends get angry at this article and, indeed, I felt annoyed by it as well. I am generally annoyed by people who tell me, or others, how I should think or what I should do, or that my actions aren’t good enough. And when women put down other women I feel a deep annoyance that is hard for me to articulate. Her argument was in the back of my mind in the lead up to the march. In the mean time I felt a tinge of inspiration and empowerment with each pussy hat I saw finished by my friends on Instagram. Still, I didn’t make one. Mostly because I didn’t expect to go to a march.

But the tides turned and I did go to a march! As I walked to the meetup spot I was nervous about who would show up. I was nervous that I would be alone in a crowd of people I didn’t know. However, that fear quickly dissipated as I got closer. I smiled as I saw all of the women walking down the street wearing Pussy Hats. I thought, “These are my people!”  And then to see a crowd of people with pink hats at the meeting spot filled my heart with joy. I could see the purpose of the hat very clearly. It was a way to unify all of. A rallying point. Later on in the day when I saw the photos of the massive crowds and the sea of pink the power of the hat really took on a whole other meaning. It was an incredible sight.

I had to laugh when I saw tweets from Trump supporters wondering who manufactured all of these hats and how did the do it so quickly! LOL! Never underestimate the power of knitters. Or of women.

I went to a meetup of the women I marched with here on Sunday. It was the first of many meetings. We are coming together to empower each other and help each other continue to fight and resist. I’m really excited to dig in and be a part of something important.

Oh! And I knitted a Pussy Hat.

Women’s March: Sandy, Oregon

Life

Friday morning started normal enough. I crawled out of bed poured my coffee and opened up the New York Times app on my phone. 5:55 am. That is the exact moment reality hit me like a ton of lead. In a few hours Trump would be sworn in as president. This was really happening.

I think that I’ve been living in denial for a long time. The reality of this man as our president has been too bizarre to wrap my head around. But when the reality hit me I couldn’t hold back the tears. I cried all day long. It was hard to even find something to keep my mind off of it. I had this weird compulsion to go online so I could connect with my friends and talk to them about this, but at the same time the online world was not doing anything for my mental health.

I woke up Saturday morning feeling a sense of dread. I searched my mind to find a reason to get up. A reason to be happy but I came up short. Several of my friends were going to the Woman’s March in Portland on that day but I couldn’t go because I am a Saturday Librarian.  I honestly wasn’t super excited about the women’s march, to be honest. Again, I think that denial caused me to not care about much of anything. I think I felt powerless and not seeing the point of protests. I didn’t even knit a pussy hat, and I’m an avid knitter! But I couldn’t do it. I couldn’t get excited about it.

Regardless, I learned a few days ago  that my small town was having it’s own women’s march. My schedule worked out that I was able to take an hour off to check it out. I thought, if anything, It would be an opportunity to shoot some film.

I am generally very shy about doing social things by myself and I was so tempted to just not go. But something deep inside compelled me to get away from the desk and start moving in the direction of the meetup spot. I honestly didn’t expect much because I live in a conservative town. I thought maybe 25 people would show up. But as I started walking I noticed small groups of women with pink hats walking in the same direction I was. My heart started beating faster. I found myself smiling a little bit. As I walked closer a small, pink headed crowd was gathered in the square.

Untitled

I was instantly heartened by the positive vibes and the crowd waiting to start. As I walked up I saw the faces of a few good friends. We hugged and talked about how happy we were to be able to march together in Sandy. We talked about how difficult the day before had been. And to see all of these people here, ready to march, seemed to have the same effect on all of us. It woke us up and empowered us a little bit.

Love is Patriotic

More and more people gathered and when it came close to 10:00 my friend said, “Gloria Steinem is doing a minute of silence at 1:00 in DC, we should do that here!” So the organizer quickly made this happen.

Moment of Silence

Then we were off! As we started marching I saw more and more friendly faces. My heart filled with so much joy. I can’t even begin to express how wonderful it was to march with my fellow townspeople, these people I have known and served at the library for 7 years. And we were all part of a much bigger thing. But we didn’t have to travel outside our town to be a part of it. I was in awe of the moment, as my fellow marchers were. And I was so grateful that the Universe conspired to get me to this place, despite my best effort to not be there. I needed this moment desperately. As I watched the news over the rest of the day and saw all of the women march in solidarity all over the world, the millions of women who came together, well, I am speechless. I have tears in my eyes even thinking about this and writing about it now. It is truly awe inspiring. We are powerful together.

It was a peaceful march. Around 200 women, men, and children marched. We stayed on the sidewalk and even waited for the light to cross streets. Many cars honked encouragement as they whizzed by us on the highway to Mt Hood. A few people yelled, “Trump” out the window but you know what? They weren’t aggressive and they were expressing their opinion. It was all good. Generally really good energy. I can honestly say it was one of the best hours of my life.

Here are a few more iPhone photos from the march. I also brought an Olympus Trip and took several portraits. I will post them when I develop the film.

Women's March on Sandy

Love Trumps Fear

Women's March on Sandy

Girls Just Wanna Have Fun damental Rights

In Our America Love Wins